Two Easy Hacks to Decrease Added Sugar

March is National Nutrition Month, and a main focus of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics is to decrease intake of added sugar. 

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March is National Nutrition Month, and this year the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics encourages everyone to learn how to “Savor the Flavor of Eating Right.”  One way we can do this is by decreasing our intake of added sugar.  How?  We use our purchasing powers!  After studying over 31,000 diet records from 2003-2010, research published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that we buy most added sugar at the grocery store.  If we follow a couple hacks, we can use our purchasing powers to refrain from buying these foods.

 

Read Food Labels. 

Avoid buying foods with ‘sugar’ listed as an ingredient.  Also, avoid sugar’s alter-egos: high fructose corn syrup, honey, brown sugar, dried cane syrup, evaporated cane juice, invert sugar, molasses, brown rice syrup, or sucrose.

Stop Buying Soda and Energy Drinks. 

Hear us out!  Soda and energy drinks account for the largest purchase of added sugar, and they even outrank desserts.  If we use our purchasing powers to skip the soda aisle, we will significantly decrease added sugar.

Added sugar makes up about 14% of total calories consumed by Americans.  The 2015-2020 Dietary Guideline for Americans recommend limiting the amount of added sugar to less than 10% of total calories.  Following these guidelines may help people keep their weight under control, and prevent chronic diseases, like diabetes and cardiovascular disease.  “Make an effort to cut back on food and beverages high in added sugar, sodium and saturated fats,” says registered dietitian nutritionist and Academy spokesperson Lisa Cimperman.  For more about National Nutrition Month and The Academy, visit eatright.org.  In case you were curious, we also purchase added sugar from fast food restaurants (6-12%), casual dining restaurants (4-6%), and school cafeterias (7%).

The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition was selected by the Special Libraries Association as one of the top 100 most influential journals in Biology and Medicine over the last 100 years.  To learn more about the value and influence of this journal, please read the AJCN Impact Statement.

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